OUTDOOR ART

Avondale Mainstreet is proud to be home to the following works

 
Double Lives

Double Lives

Holly Ross 1850 Great North Road Another awesome project from Whau the People, Double Lives is part of a greater project “to create more opportunities for women in hip hop to connect, share their stories and access a greater audience for their artwork. Its purpose is to provide a sense of a community for women in a predominantly male-dominated sub-culture.”

Indian mural

Indian mural

Avondale artist, SMITA UPADHYE 2021 Great North Road This mural was a collaboration with Auckland Council’s graffiti team and Tag Out Trust who recognise that graffiti and other nuisance behaviours are reduced when an area is improved. Re-planting of the adjacent garden was also part of the project. The content was chosen to celebrate our residential and business Indian communities and to coincide with the celebration of Diwali. With support from Bunnings New Lynn.

OVER, GASP and TRUSTME 2016

OVER, GASP and TRUSTME 2016

1907 Great North Road, Avondale (side of Kings Foodmart): ‘Welcome to Avondale’ is the third mural to occupy this wall in Avondale. It was only intended to remain for a year (like the previous two), however, the community spoke and there it remains! Supported by Whau the People for the Whau Arts Festival 2016.

Numangatini MacKenzie 2019

Numangatini MacKenzie 2019

1913 Great North Road, Avondale: This mural was first painted in 2014 as part of the inaugural Whau Arts Festival with permissions and support from the local community. It was painted out a day later, without permission by then ABA chair, Duncan MacDonald. In 2019, following Duncan's removal, Numa reinstated the mural and the faces accompanying it. Both iterations were supported by Whau the People for the Whau Arts Festival 2014 and 2019.

Atarangi Anderson 2020

Atarangi Anderson 2020

58 Rosebank Road, Avondale: ko tahi te ha o te tipuna me te mokopuna. One breath between our ancestors and the future generations. Artist Atarangi Anderson gifting Avondale a new mural in February 2020. Through her work she hopes to bring a stronger representation of wāhine and whakapapa by painting wāhine in symbolic lines of kapa haka and lineage. The background is a patch work of colours to make connections back to the knowledge stored within the wharenui. The colours also link to the Marae mattresses which lay within the wharenui and give generations of whanau a place to sleep and rest. This mural goal is to say we are here. Supported with the combined efforts of Whau The People, Creative Souls, Creative New Zealand, Fred (for water blasting the wall) and the Avondale Business Association.

Paul X Walsh 2019

Paul X Walsh 2019

Visible from St Judes St, Avondale (side of Cosmopolitan Retirement Village): Preserving History St Ninian's Church is one of Auckland's oldest churches and has been undergoing intensive renovations to preserve it. This then is a play on words - 'preserves' is also fruit preserves, so this is St Ninian's Church nestled in a microcosm of Auckland's unique landscape - and all of it being 'preserved' in a jam jar. Supported by Whau the People for the Whau Arts Festival 2019

Louis Statham 2009

Louis Statham 2009

Several black & white works from Louis Statham are scattered throughout – at the library, Crayford St West, Rosebank Road, on power boxes and this at Wingate. The Avondale Community Board spearheaded the project prescribing images from the 1994 book "Challenge of the Whau."

TakerOne 2016

TakerOne 2016

2000 Great North Road, Avondale Behold three New Zealand native birds, from left to right: Kereru (New Zealand Pigeon), Karearea (New Zealand Falcon) and Pukeko (Purple Swamphen)

Mural by Tawck

Mural by Tawck

2016 Great North Road, Avondale | For the “Spare Some Change for Change” fundraiser for victims of the 2019 Christchurch terror attack

TakerOne 2016

TakerOne 2016

2000 Great North Road, Avondale: Originally from Hungary, the artist came to New Zealand on a working holiday visa looking for opportunities to pursue his artistic passions. Arriving in Avondale, he met Pascal, then owner of the adjacent hostel, who was kind enough to support him in getting paint and permission. The spray-painted work is of his best friend and roommate, Lili and one of her dogs named, Bunny. He worked on the mural for a week, between four to six hours a day.

Numangatini MacKenzie 2016

Numangatini MacKenzie 2016

99 Rosebank Road, Avondale: This mural grew from workshops with the Avondale Community Preschool and Avondale Rest Home to co-create a mural on the entrance wall for the Avondale Community Centre. Focussed on our local identity, and the voices of different generations living in our community, Numa designed the final mural inspired by the pūngāwerewere. This mural was part of a project created by Whau the People that focussed on different generations coming together through art.

Dale, the spider

Dale, the spider

The spider statue was erected by the Avondale Business Association and launched amongst fanfare with the new town centre in July 2002, at which time it was dubbed, Dale. Dale is a huntsman spider – a native of Australia which is known to span 20 cm when the legs are extended. They arrived in Avondale in the early ‘20s probably in a load of railway sleepers delivered to the local station. The newcomers settled in the area and came to be called Avondale Spiders.

 

©2020 by Avondale Mainstreet. Proudly created with Wix.com